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sriram private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jezza_91
Realistically if you take out the time you rest, drinking water, wait for a machine or weights, not to mention chit chat. Your probs in 20/40 mins. I went in one day to an empty gym did everything i had to and was out by 30 mins


I second this, had an empty gym once and at the end of the session I was really confused as to whether or not I missed a workout...
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eknight private msg quote post Address this user
Regarding "overtraining" and long workouts, it's already been established that exercise induced cortisol results in greater hypertrophy gains than exercise induced GH or IGF-1. Kinda shoots a hole in the entire, "training for longer than an hour is catabolic and overtraining due to the hormones" approach, huh? -3X
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samirsaleh private msg quote post Address this user
if u were being charged for every minute spent at the gym, how long would ur workout take you ?

Thats the correct amount of time you should be spending
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4real private msg quote post Address this user
@samirsaleh That's a horrible analogy....
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samirsaleh private msg quote post Address this user
@4real point is if u can finish ur workout in less time without compromise, then thats the right thing to do.
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sriram private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by samirsaleh
@4real point is if u can finish ur workout in less time without compromise, then thats the right thing to do.


I don't think equating time in the gym as efficiency is something applicable in bodybuilding/weight lifting. I'd prefer spending twice the time to really get that time under tension as well as really focusing on mind-muscle connection than finishing early and risking those variables. Though, and I am merely infering, you may be implying that if you could do execute every exercise perfectly while minimizing delay (i.e. time between sets looking for plates or waiting for someone to finish a set), then yes, you would ideally limit time in the gym.
Though I think, from this discussion that there is a difference between "time in gym" and "time lifting in gym"; I'd agree that limiting "time in gym" due to external factors (high traffic in the gym resulting in sharing of plates, dumbbells, or machines, meeting someone you know, drinking at the water fountain) is valid but never to compromise "time lifting in the gym".

Also to reiterate @eknight's point
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel W. D. West and Stuart M. Phillips
that cortisol, which is catabolic in nature, is elevated after exercise programs that induce hypertrophy.

which I believe may also be a good argument against going to failure on compound lifts at the beginning of a session.
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samirsaleh private msg quote post Address this user
@sriram ya ofcourse, what i was referring to as "less time" is the time in between sets, the time spent talking to others, socializing, checking out chics, or deciding what the next exercise should be etc..

The actual time spent lifting should be as long as it takes you to establish the "mind-muscle" connection you were talking about
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Broschette private msg quote post Address this user
I dont believe in over training
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WinnersNeverQuit private msg quote post Address this user
@Broschette I do, it's incredibly hard to do but it is still possible. I often use overreaching programmes a lot of the time as well.
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Piggles private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broschette
I dont believe in over training


Kind of off topic but far more interesting...

Yeah I tend to agree, I think it's one of those buzzwords people like to use as a barrier to training hard.

There is definitely a massive difference between training a muscle group frequently/hard/while it has DOMS etc, and being in the state of being 'over-trained'.
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jonrivs49 private msg quote post Address this user
For me overtraining dont happen on the same day.. For me overtraining happens, for example.. you do bench and the second day you workout your tricep. That is overtraining to the tricep, because you incorporate some tri in chest day already and havent fully recovered. especially when you intend to do it failure.
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Piggles private msg quote post Address this user
I'm pretty sure over-training cannot happen in a day, it's a state of emotional and physical depression which can take weeks to recuperate from, i.e. training through DOMS is not over-training, but may lead to over-training if done all the time.
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eknight private msg quote post Address this user
I've experienced overtraining. It is absolutely real, it absolutely exists, and it absolutely sucks. It's also extremely difficult to accomplish. Midway through my powerlifting career, I did 10 meets in about an 18 month stretch. I was constantly hypocaloric, constantly trying to make my body peak, just kept pouring STP in the engine trying to get a few more miles. I ended up bombing out at my last meet, had horrible insomnia, and actually stopped training for around 8 weeks. Not fun. -3X
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JLC private msg quote post Address this user
As eknight explains ...

I've also experienced overtraining. Couldnt sleep at night at all, only during the day. Tired, not happy and so on. So YES - it does exist. I took a week of from school and work and just chilled and took care of myself.
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